Basic Goat Milk Soap Recipe: Soothing and Rejuvenating!

Goat milk as an additive to skin care products has long been used to sooth and solve skin issues.  Raw goat milk in high in vitamins and minerals, in particularly vitamin A, which aids in repairing damaged skin. It is also naturally rich in caprylic acid, which soothes and rejuvenates skin. Lactic acid (an alpha-hydroxy acid) is also present in goat milk which removes dead skin cells and is believed to stimulate the production of collagen and elastin. Goat milk soap is very gentle on the skin and is perfect for people who suffer from eczema, delicate, or dry skin. We have our own goat milk and one way of dealing with excess milk is to freeze it and later use it in body products such as this.

Soap-making is a skill everyone should learn.  It is easy, fun, environmentally friendly, economical and practical.  Once I began making soap, I soon discovered that you can replace the water in any recipe with goat milk, 1:1.  This allowed me to use my own goat milk to create recipes and products of high quality for a very low cost.

This recipe is a simple one.  Coconut oil, sustainably-produced palm oil and olive oil are all easy to find ingredients. You can substitute the goat milk for plain distilled water if you wish.

This recipe is meant as an ingredient list and basic directions for experienced soap-makers.  Click here for a complete photo tutorial with explicit directions.

Here is the recipe:

Ingredients:

•26.5 oz. Olive oil Pomace
•16.5 ounces Coconut oil
•10 oz. Sustainably sourced Palm Kernal oil
•209 grams Lye
•2.7 oz. Essential oils of your choice
•20 oz. goat milk frozen in ice cube sized chunks.

Directions:

  1. Prepare your mold.
  2. Combine and melt olive oil, coconut oil and palm oil to 115F.
  3. VERY slowly, pour measured lye into semi-thawed (slushy) goat milk.  Stir constantly.  Measure temperature constantly.  If milk heats up too fast it will turn orange and scorch, so do this step very slowly.  Ideally you will get your lye mixture up to about 115F.
  4. Combine lye mixture with oils when temperatures are the same (between 105-115F).
  5. Using a stick blender, blend combination until product reaches trace.
  6. Add any essential oils, dried herbs etc at trace.
  7. Pour into mold. Cover mold with either plastic wrap or cardboard.
  8. Cover with towels to prevent cooling too quickly.
  9. 24 hours later, cut into bars.
  10. Set bars on towel in warm, dry location away from direct sunlight.  Let them “saponify” for at least 4 weeks.

Enjoy!

 

*Most ingredients can be found in natural health food stores and/or soap making supply stores.  Alternatively, ingredients can be ordered online from Mountain Rose Herbs: “Exceptional quality certified organic herbs and spices, with a strict emphasis on sustainable agriculture.” By clicking on the links above you can buy directly from Mountain Rose Herbs.  I have an affiliate program with them and make a small percentage of sales made that are re-directed from my site.

This post has been linked to Frugal Days, Sustainable Ways #76, Waste Not, Want Not Wednesdays, Wildcrafting Wednesdays #92, and From The Farm Blog Hop #36.

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Chamomile-Infused Fresh Hand and Body Lotion Recipe

I recently introduced you to fresh lotion, an age-old product that dates back thousands of years, long before chemical preservatives were introduced.  The only difference between commercial lotions and fresh lotions is that fresh lotions contain absolutely no chemical preservatives, and thus the shelf life is limited to a few months rather than a few years.  Fresh lotion is superior to commercial lotion just as fresh food is superior to preserved food.  I have chosen to share my recipes with you to encourage everyone to make small batches of fresh lotions and use them up, rather than adding preservatives which may be harmful to our bodies. To read more about the benefits of fresh lotions, click here.

This fresh hand lotion recipe is built from my basic lotion recipe, but also contains aloe vera gel, witch hazel and chamomile-infused oil.  It is the perfect consistency for a pump bottle, which will also help keep bacteria from entering the product.

Aloe Vera is a cactus plant that belongs to the Liliaceae family.  The gel is extracted from the thick leaves simply by cutting open and scooping out, or can be used to treat burns topically simply by placing a cutting of the plant directly on the burn.  Aloe vera has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties and is beneficial to skin regeneration.  It’s non-greasy, moisturizing qualities make it a great ingredient in fresh lotions.  Learn how to extract it from your own plants for use here.

Witch Hazel is an extract from the leaves and bark of the North American shrub  Hamamelis virginiana.  It has impressive anti-inflammatory qualities and is known to be beneficial in the treatment of, among other skin conditions, diaper rash, razor burn and bug bites.  Witch hazel is also anti-microbial and is used to heal bruises and cuts. It demonstrates some anti-bacterial and anti-viral qualities.

Chamomile flowers come from the Anthemis Eecutita plant.  They are easily harvested from your own flower garden by removing the flowering tops and dehydrating them.  They can be used fresh as well.  Chamomile has powerful anti-inflammatory properties from its natural chemical component, azulene.  It is used for healing and soothing rough or damaged skin.  Chamomile flowers can be used to make a calming herbal tea, or an be infused with oil to be used in cosmetics, providing a beneficial, soothing oil.  To learn how to infuse oils yourself click here.

Materials

  • Immersion blender
  • Kitchen scale
  • Wide mouth mason jar
  • Spoon
  • Small, thick-bottomed pot
  • Small pyrex liquid measuring cup

Ingredients

Directions

  1. In a thick-bottomed pot melt beeswax with oil just until it is melted.  Once melted, add rosemary oil or vitamin E, and essential oil.  Pour into a wide mouth mason jar, set aside and allow to cool until room temperature.
  2. The following ingredients must be at room temperature before beginning.  In a measuring cup weigh and add hydrosol or water, witch hazel and aloe vera. Set aside.
  3. When wax/oil mixture has cooled down to room temperature (touch the outside of the jar.  If it is hot, it isn’t ready yet) but is still soft, begin blending with a stick blender.  SLOWLY pour your water mixture into the jar in a slow, continuous stream, while blending constantly, circling around the mixture to make sure it is all blended in. You can move the emersion blender up and down and around to help the process.  Don’t pause until all the water has been added.  Continue to blend for a few minutes to ensure your mixture has emulsified.
  4. Store in a lidded container for up to 2 months.  Refrigeration will help prolong shelf life.

Notes:

  • It is very important to combine your ingredients when they have reached room temperature or your emulsion will fail and your water will separate.  If this happens, drain off the water and use the lotion as a body butter.  It will be greasier but will still make a nice product.
  • Always ensure your hands are clean when you use the lotion to prevent bacteria from entering your lotion.
  • It is helpful to sterilize your utensils first with boiling water to help prevent bacteria from entering the lotion.
  • You can interchange or combine other liquid oils.  Grapeseed oil is known to be one of the least greasy of the oils.
  • If you want to add a solid oil (for example coconut oil or cocoa butter) to your recipe make sure most of the recipe is still a liquid oil so the product doesn’t get too solid at room temperature before you have combined the water and the oil.
  • You can use any hydrosol or floral water to replace the distilled water. Check the ingredients first to make sure they are pure. Some people have luck using flower “teas” such as chamomile, green tea or calendula but note that this might increase the spoiling rate.
  • When choosing essential oils keep in mind that citrus-based oils can be photo-toxic. Used in moisturizers on skin that is exposed to the sun can cause severe sunburns.
  • I have linked ingredients to Mountain Rose Herbs, a company that provides high quality, organic ingredients from sustainable sources. Mountain Rose Herbs is my first choice in companies that provide quality ingredients.  Alternatively, most ingredients can be purchased in natural food stores.
  • Here is a link to make your own infused oils.

This post has been linked to Waste Not Want Not Wednesday #25, Wildcrafting Wednesday #83Simple Living Wednesday, Small Footprint Friday #24, Frugal Days, Sustainable Ways # 68 , Small Footprint Friday and Homestead Abundance.

 

You might also be interested in reading:
Back To The Basics: An Introduction To Fresh Lotion and a Recipe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whipped Body Butter Recipe: 2 Simple Ingredients

“Decadent, smooth and rich.”

This Christmas I am, once again, attempting to make (almost) all of my Christmas gifts.  A great gift to give is something that can be used up.  Natural body products are not cheap to buy, but they can be fun and economical to make.

Body butters are oil-based and contain no water-based ingredients.  They are a mixture of oils and butters.  They are very hydrating, but they tend to be greasy.  I have been searching for a way to make oil-based butters smooth and light.  I have finally come across a simple way of dealing with butters: you whip them.  Like whipping cream.  This makes them soft, light, and less oily since there is air whipped into the product.  You can add any essential oil you like, and the overall appearance, texture and hydration is decadent.  The final product feels and looks like whipped cream.  I was very tempted to eat mine…
One thing to keep in mind with whipped butters, however, is that they are really only an oil and they will “melt” back into their oil state IF the temperature at which they melt is reached.  For example, a coconut oil-based whipped butter will melt at 24C (depending on what temperature your oil melts at.  Different coconut oils have different melting points).  Other butters may have a slightly higher melting point.  If your house gets higher than that melting point, or you keep it in a steamy bathroom, or on top of the dishwasher (which I did) it will melt back into an oil and you will have to re-whip it.  You can keep it in the fridge if you are worried about the temperature.

Does it stay like whipped cream for a long time!  YES!  It does.  How long?  I don’t know, but it hasn’t melted on me yet, and so I’d say weeks at least, if not permanently.With a mild and delicious cocoa fragrance, it isn’t necessary to add extra fragrance, but you certainly can if you like. Do not use citrus essential oils in body products since they are photo-toxic when exposed to sunshine. I am not a huge fan of the smell of coconut oil and so I choose the coconut oil that is fragrance-free.

Is this product non-greasy?  No.  It doesn’t contain alcohol or any other ingredients that “dry it out”.  But it is much less greasy than heavy, unwhipped body butter, and it will depend on the butters and oils you use (some are less greasy than others).

Over the next few weeks I will be playing with different ingredients, including kokum and mango butter, two butters which are less oily than cocoa butter and coconut oil.  I have shea butter which is extremely hydrating, and I will also be experimenting with infusing herbal extracts such as calendula, chamomile, green tea and lavender, into some of these oils to make whipped butter recipes that provide soothing, calming and anti-aging properties.  Subscribe to be updated regularly or “like” us on facebook so you know when these new recipes are available.

Ingredients:
6 oz. Coconut Oil (fractionated coconut oil is less greasy but any kind will work)
2 oz. Cocoa Butter
Essential oil if desired.

Materials:

  • Electric mixer and stainless steel bowl
  • Scale
  • Small pot
  • Pyrex measuring cup
  • Whisk or fork
  • Spoon
  • Spatula
  • Storage jar and lid

Directions:

  • In a small pot or double boiler, over low heat, melt 2 oz. of cocoa butter.
  • Add and melt 6 oz. of coconut oil.

  • Once oils are melted but NOT boiling, immediately remove from heat, pour into mixing bowl and refrigerate.
  • Once your mixture looks slightly opaque, remove from fridge and whip.  I use a stand mixer which makes the process go a lot faster.  It will get creamy quickly, but won’t whip immediately.
  • Once it is creamy put it back in the fridge for another 5 minutes or so and whip again. 
  • Once it starts to whip like whipping cream, you know you have it.  If it doesn’t, put it back in the fridge for a few more minutes and try again.  It could take up to 10 minutes of solid whipping to turn it into whipped butter.  It will get quite “stiff” and feel like chocolate mousse if you whip it long enough.
  • Once it starts to form soft peaks you can add your essential oil (if desired) and you are done!
  • Spoon it into jars and put lids on.
  • Store in a cool location.

 

Notes:

  • If you are looking for a good source to purchase body product ingredients check out Mountain Rose Herbs.  Exceptional quality, certified organic ingredients.
  • Cocoa butter helps increase or maintain skin elasticity and is very hydrating.
  • Coconut oil is, among many other things, rich in antioxidants and contains natural microbial and antibacterial properties making it a great oil choice for body products.
  • A little goes a long way.  Use a small amount!

This post has been shared on Frugally Sustainable’s Frugal Days, Sustainable Ways 56, Farm Girl Friday Blogfest #12, Homestead Barn Hop #91, Seasonal Celebration Wednesday #42, Wildcrafting Wednesday and Waste Not Want Not Wednesday #8.