How to Make Apple Cider Vinegar from Apple Peelings.

Apple cider vinegar has become a buzz word amongst the health-conscious crowd lately, and rightfully so. It is not only a culinary necessity, but it can cure skin conditions, detangle hair, stop heartburn, play a roll in weight loss and detox the body. Click here for more information on apple cider vinegar. Real apple cider vinegar, with the mother, may be easy to find in the grocery store now, but it isn't cheap. In fact, you can expect to pay around $9.99 for 1 L (quart) at many grocery stores. This doesn't go over very well with the budget, but the good news is, it can be made for almost nothing, from apple scraps you would normally compost or feed to your chickens. AND it is easy to make. Sound good? Yes! Here is how. And start collecting your glass ACV or maple syrup bottles now! Make apple sauce/apple pies/apple fruit leather/apple WHATEVER, where peeling and coring the apples is involved. Enjoy your whatever, and keep your apple peelings. If you don't have enough for the first go round, store it in a zip lock or a jar in the freezer and add to it until you have enough. You can use apple cores too, if you aren't concerned about the minimal amount of cyanide that is in the apple seeds. If this is a concern for you, then just use the peels.Directions:
  1. Collect your apple peelings and put them in a gallon glass jar/container. Those large pickle jars from Costco, or from the thrift store, work perfectly. Even a large glass cookie jar will work.
  2. Once your jar is filled with peelings, cover it with a water/sugar syrup made from 1 gallon of boiling water with 1 cup of white sugar dissolved in it. Your peels might float a bit. Some people weight it down with something so they don't float. I don't bother.
  3. Set your jar in a cool, dark-ish location (I used my laundry room) and cover the jar with cheese cloth and an elastic, making sure it is thick enough that fruit flies won't get in. Because they will try!
  4. Stir once a day for 1 week.
  5. After a week, strain the apple peels through cheese cloth and allow to drain over a bowl overnight, to collect the juice. Then give the cheese cloth a good squeeze, and feed the apple peels to the chickens/pigs.
  6. Pour the strained juice back into the jar and cover with cheese cloth again.
  7. Stir once a day.
  8. Store in a cool location out of direct light for 6 weeks or until it tastes as strong as you'd like it.
  9. Bottle and store in your pantry or fridge indefinitely. Enjoy!
Tips:
  • If you notice mold on your apple cider vinegar at any stage, skim it off and keep going. I have never experienced mold growth but have read that it can happen.
  • Some people weight their apple peels down during the first week so no apple peels are exposed to air. They have a tendency to float. You can do this if you like, but as long as you stir it once a day I don't think it is necessary, and I never bother.
How to Make Apple Cider Vinegar from Apple Peelings.
Author: 
Recipe type: Condiment
 
Make your own apple cider vinegar from scrap apples!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 gallon water (4 litres)
  • Apple peels and cores
Instructions
  1. Collect your apple peelings and put them in a gallon glass jar/container. Those large pickle jars from Costco, or from the thrift store, work perfectly. Even a large glass cookie jar will work.
  2. Once your jar is filled with peelings, cover it with a water/sugar syrup made from 1 quart of boiling water with 1 cup of white sugar dissolved in it. Your peels might float a bit. Some people weight it down with something so they don’t float. I don’t bother.
  3. Set your jar in a cool, dark-ish location (I used my laundry room) and cover the jar with cheese cloth and an elastic, making sure it is thick enough that fruit flies won’t get in. Because they will try!
  4. Stir once a day for 1 week.
  5. After a week, strain the apple peels through cheese cloth and allow to drain over a bowl overnight, to collect the juice. Then give the cheese cloth a good squeeze, and feed the apple peels to the chickens/pigs.
  6. Pour the strained juice back into the jar and cover with cheese cloth again.
  7. Stir once a day.
  8. Store in a cool location out of direct light for 6 weeks or until it tastes as strong as you’d like it.
  9. Bottle and store in your pantry or fridge indefinitely. Enjoy!
Notes
◾If you notice mold on your apple cider vinegar at any stage, skim it off and keep going. I have never experienced mold growth but have read that it can happen. ◾Some people weight their apple peels down during the first week so no apple peels are exposed to air. They have a tendency to float. You can do this if you like, but as long as you stir it once a day I don’t think it is necessary, and I never bother.

 

 

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Comments

  1. Martha Lydia Lanata says:

    I Just finish to bottle the apple-cider-vinegar, I hope that it goes on as well as now. Thanks a lot to share it. Do you Know a recipe of apple sauce, made of apple peels?.

  2. I have a jar with a lid. Can I use the lid or do I have to cover it with cheese cloth

    • You need to use a cloth of some sort. If you put a lid on you will be doing an anaerobic fermentation. (no oxygen) (which would result in alcohol). If you just use cloth, you allow it to breathe and become vinegar, or aerobic fermentation.

  3. Malia Lynch says:

    Hi! Thank you for this recipe – I just got 3 huge bags of apples and love not wasting anything… So, I just finished the first step, and I am curious are we also making apple cider? I gave it a taste and it tastes like cider. If I didn't let it sit and become vinegar, could I drink this as cider?? Thanks in advance!

    • Vinegar is made when you use an aerobic fermentation which means you allow oxygen to enter. Cider is made using an anaerobic fermentation which means there is no oxygen present. If you created cider then you may have left the lid on? I have never intentionally made cider so I have no idea as to what the alcohol content would be or whether or not it would be safe to drink.

  4. Shannon Scruggs says:

    In #2 of your instructions it states that I should mix 1 quart of boiling water & 1 cup of sugar then pour. However in the ingredients; it calls for 1 gallon of water & 1 cup of sugar. Can you help me understand that? I know I am missing something :)

  5. its not cider if apples havent been pressed malia. I have done this(making the vinegar) and it works. its just rather weak. the old recipe(from a VERY old cookbook, said if its too weak just use the same water w/ more apple peels til it suits you. I cant see that the 'vinegar' would be bad to drink. it has to ferment for the above amount of day/weeks before its actually vinegar. the old recipe
    also stated to set the covered jar out on a sunny breezy day to catch the yeasts that are naturally all around us. the organisms are what start the fermentation.

  6. Do you have to use sugar? I did not know sugar was used in apple cider vinegar.

  7. Jennifer Dee George Norris says:

    The cheese cloth in your pictures is much more substantial than what I have found. I used several layers but the fruit flies still got in. Can you please tell me about yours.

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