Dandelion Fritters and other great ways to use dandelions!

Dandelion Fritters watermarked2Dandelions are one of the first flowering plants to provide pollen for our honeybees.  We don’t pick them until our property is covered with the beautiful yellow jewels.  By then there are plenty for the bees and for us.  Many people think of the dandelions as ruthless weeds, but they actually are quite useful.  The tender green leaves harvested in early spring are often the first fresh greens available to anyone and can be added to salads.  The blossoms taste mildly sweet and floral, and the roots in the fall can be roasted to make a healthy tea.  We picked the blossoms this time, battered and fried them in coconut oil, then dipped some of them in cinnamon sugar for a sweet treat, and dipped the others in honey mustard for a savory treat.  To me, they tasted kind of like fried mushrooms.  The kids gobbled them up and then, I am sure, amused their teachers and friends by telling them all the ways you can eat dandelions.dandelion fritters collage

Dandelions are loaded with nutrients.  Sunwarrior tells us how good they are for you:

Dandelion is a very rich source of beta-carotene which we convert into vitamin A. This flowering plant is also rich in vitamin C, fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and phosphorus. It is a good place to get B complex vitamins, trace minerals, organic sodium, and even vitamin D. Dandelion contains protein too, more than spinach. It has been eaten for thousands of years and used to treat anemia, scurvy, skin problems, blood disorders, and depression. – See more at: 11 health benefits of Dandelions

Dandelions grow all over the world, so chances are, if you don’t use chemicals on your lawn, you will have lots of dandelions in the spring.  Don’t confuse them with a similar flower that grows later in the year. Find lots of different ways to use dandelions below the recipe!

4.5 from 2 reviews
Dandelion Fritters
Author: 
Recipe type: Appetizer
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
Dandelion blossoms fried in coconut oil add a fresh, flowery, locally grown treat to your spring diet.
Ingredients
  • 2 cups fresh dandelion blossoms, without stems
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup milk
  • ½ cup coconut oil
  • sugar and cinnamon to taste, if desired
  • honey mustard for dipping, if desired
Instructions
  1. With a whisk, blend flour, egg and milk until smooth consistency.
  2. Gently heat oil in skillet
  3. Pick up dandelion blossom by the bump on the back, and dip it into the batter until it is totally covered.
  4. Place blossom in oil, blossom side down. Once it has browned a little, flip the blossom with a fork and brown a bit on the other side.
  5. Remove blossom from frying pan with a fork, let excess oil drip off, then roll in cinnamon sugar or set aside to be dipped in honey mustard.
  6. Enjoy!

Learn more about how to use dandelions from these great links!

How To Harvest Medicinal Roots: Dandelion and Valerian from Homespun Seasonal Living

Useful Weed Dandelion from Homespun Seasonal Living

Harvesting and Using Dandelion Roots from Common Sense Homesteading

How To Make Dandelion Wine and Cookies from Common Sense Homesteading

How To Make Dandelion Salve from Montana Homsteader

Make Dandelion Pesto and Save the Goodness for Later from Joybilee Farm

Dandelion Jelly from Green Eggs and Goats

Dandelions: Foraging Them, Eating Them and Keeping Them Out of your Lawns from Yearning and Learning

 

 

Homemade Sustainably-Sourced Chocolates. Easy To Make and Delicious.

I stopped buying those cheap, junky chocolate Easter eggs from the dollar stores a few years ago. They are probably made in China, and definitely not all natural or sustainably-sourced. When my kids get treats, I like them to be at least made with safe ingredients. Even better, from reliable sources that aren’t damaging both the natural environment and the people who are growing and processing the cocoa beans.
Last year I bought sustainably-sourced chocolate bars, broke them into squares, and wrapped them in aluminum foil. This worked fine… but was kind of boring. This year, I made my own. It turned out to be a fun, rewarding experience, and was simple enough to have the children help out!

I made several different recipes, but found these two to be the best:

The recipe by Wellness Mama is made with sustainably-sourced cocoa butter and cocoa powder, raw honey and vanilla. Nothing more, nothing less. The recipe by Cupcake Project can also use sustainably-sourced, organic ingredients. One of the batches of chocolates I subbed 3/4 of the powdered sugar for raw honey and it turned out really well. In another batch I added a tbsp. of cashew butter to the white chocolate recipe for a nutty treat. If you can’t find organic powdered sugar you can make it yourself from this recipe from Whole New Mom using certified organic cane sugar and arrowroot powder to avoid the typical GMO sugar and GMO corn starch.

 


Both provided easy-to-follow instructions, used ingredients that can be sourced sustainably, and created a delicious product that I’ll be working with in the future! Think… dark chocolate with sea salt and butterscotch… white chocolate hazelnut… the possibilities are now endless! And what great gifts they would make!

If you make some, please let me know how they turned out, and if you varied the ingredients with great success! Enjoy and Happy Easter!

Easy Homemade Marshmallows Recipe

Marshmallows are a fun treat.  People roast them over bonfires, melt them in hot chocolate, make s’mores with them, make rice crispy squares with them and so on.  But have you ever read the ingredient list on a bag of Jet Puffed marshmallows?  It isn’t very pretty.

Corn Syrup, Sugar, Dextrose, Corn Starch Modified, Water, Gelatin, Tetrasodium Pyrophosphate A Whipping Aid, Flavor(s) Artificial, Color(s) Artificial (Blue 1)

Corn syrup is super-concentrated, highly processed, and made from GMO corn.  Sugar is made from GMO sugar beets.  Corn starch is made from GMO corn.  Tetrasodium pyrophosphate A is… well, a chemical used as a thickener, and if ingested in large doses requires immediate medical attention.  It is also a skin and eye irritant.   Yum.  Artificial flavor and color (color?  In white marshmallows?!) is self-explanatory.  So basically, they are trash.  I don’t want my kids to eat them, period. But wait!  You CAN make them at home with safer and natural ingredients.  Easily!  You don’t have to forever ditch marshmallows!  And they taste better than store-bought ones. Let me just say this first: everyone should make marshmallows at least once.  Partly because it is a fun, tasty treat, but also to demonstrate first-hand how much sugar is in a marshmallow.  It is rather astonishing, and proves that marshmallows should, indeed, be a once in a long time treat, even if you make them with safe ingredients.

Easy Homemade Marshmallows Recipe
Author: 
Recipe type: snack
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 24 marshmallows
 
Simple, delicious homemade marshmallows without the artificial ingredients, color, additives or GMOs.
Ingredients
  • Butter, for greasing the pan and parchment paper
  • 4 envelopes unflavored gelatin
  • 3 c. granulated sugar (I used organic white cane sugar)
  • 1¼ c. raw honey
  • ¼ tsp. sea salt
  • 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract
  • 1½ c. confectioner's sugar (icing sugar)
Instructions
  1. Grease a 9x13 inch cake pan with butter. Add parchment paper on top of the buttered pan, and carefully fit it inside the pan. Allow 1 inch overhang on each side. Grease the paper well. Set aside.
  2. Put sugar, honey, salt and ¾ c. water in a small pot. Heat and stir until sugar is dissolved. Turn off heat.
  3. Put ¾ c. cold water in mixing bowl and then add gelatin. Stir well and let sit for 5 minutes.
  4. With a mixer, whisk water/gelatin mixture and add honey/sugar mixture slowly. Increase speed and whip on high until mixture is thick, white and forms peaks. Whip in vanilla. This could take 10 minutes.
  5. Pour into prepared baking dish, scrape bowl and smooth the top with buttered spatula.
  6. Set aside uncovered until firm, about 3 hours.
  7. Sift 1 c. icing sugar onto counter top. Grease your hands and a knife. Flip set mixture onto icing sugar on the counter top. Cut into squares.
  8. Dip marshmallows into remaining icing sugar on all sides and set on a plate.
  9. Serve immediately or store for up to a week in an airtight container.

The recipe is above.  For more details and photos please read below. Notes:

  • It is very important to grease your hands and utensils before touching the marshmallows once the mixture is combined or you may be permanently stuck to the marshmallows!!
  • The marshmallows are slightly softer than store-bought ones.  The more days you let them sit, the firmer they become.
  • If using on a bon-fire, be very careful… they melt faster than store-bought ones and may fall off the stick if you don’t watch closely.
  • Unless you are using certified organic confectioners sugar you will be using GMO sugar with GMO corn starch added.  You can easily make your own confectioners sugar using organic white cane sugar and arrowroot powder by following this recipe.

1. Grease a 9×13 inch cake pan with butter. Add parchment paper on top of the buttered pan, and carefully fit it inside the pan. Allow 1 inch overhang on each side. Grease the paper well. Set aside. 2.Put sugar, honey, salt and 3/4 c. water in a small pot. Heat and stir until sugar is dissolved. Turn off heat. 3.  Put 3/4 c. cold water in mixing bowl and then add gelatin. Stir well and let sit for 5 minutes. 4. With a mixer, whisk water/gelatin mixture and add honey/sugar mixture slowly. Increase speed and whip on high until mixture is thick, white and forms peaks. Whip in vanilla. This could take 10 minutes. 5. Pour into prepared baking dish, scrape bowl and smooth the top with buttered spatula.  Set aside uncovered until firm, about 3 hours.   6. Sift 1 c. icing sugar onto counter top. Grease your hands and a knife. Flip set mixture onto icing sugar on the counter top. Cut into squares. 7.  Dip marshmallows into remaining icing sugar on all sides and set on a plate.  Serve immediately or store for up to a week in an airtight container.  

 

 

How to Make Whole Grain Pancake Mix From Scratch

Pancakes are a treat in my household, and also a go-to meal when I am on the run. I make them for breakfast on school mornings, and I make them when I am late arriving home for the evening, and I need a quick meal on the table. I am not a fan of any kind of store-bought mix, partly because many of them contain unhealthy preservatives and GMO ingredients, and partly because they are ridiculously easy to make from scratch, especially with a homemade mix. I took my favorite pancake recipe, one I have altered over the years to fit my family’s needs and likes, and turned it into a “quick-mix” type pancake mix. All you need to do is add an egg, milk and oil and you have batter ready for the pan! Freeze the left overs and they make even quicker breakfasts for the toaster.

How to Make Pancake Mix From Scratch
Author: 
Recipe type: Baking Mix
Cuisine: Breakfast
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
From scratch pancake mix recipe. Easy and healthy!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup flour (whole wheat, spelt, white, or a combination)
  • 1 tbsp. Demerara sugar
  • 1 tbsp. ground flax
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. salt
Instructions
  1. Combine the ingredients and mix well.
  2. Store in an air-tight jar.
  3. Double, quadruple or more the recipe!
Notes
When making pancakes, to 1 cup of mix add: 1 egg, beaten. 1 c. milk (goat, cow or non-dairy). 2 tbsp. melted butter or coconut oil. To make a double batch, simply add 2 cups mix and double the wet ingredients.

 

The Best Homemade Hot Fudge Sauce Ever!

Nothing beats a hot fudge sundae… unless it is a hot fudge sundae made with homemade ice cream and homemade hot fudge sauce. Most hot fudge sauces contain artificial flavor and color, preservatives, high fructose corn syrup and thickeners, making it a treat not worthy of it’s calling. Thankfully it is easy to make with all natural ingredients, and tastes far better than any product you could buy. This recipe is coming to you just in time for Valentine’s Day! Bring on the sundaes!  This recipe is adapted from Smitten Kitchen’s Hot Fudge Sundae Cake recipe.

 

5.0 from 1 reviews
The Best Homemade Hot Fudge Sauce Ever!
Author: 
Recipe type: Condiment
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 2 cups
 
All Natural Homemade Hot Fudge Sauce. Can we -almost- say healthy?
Ingredients
  • ⅔ cup heavy or whipping cream
  • ½ cup honey
  • ⅓ cup packed dark brown sugar
  • ¼ cup cocoa powder
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 1 cup chocolate chips, divided
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • ½ tsp. vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. In a heavy saucepan, bring cream, honey, sugar, cocoa, salt and half the chocolate to a boil.
  2. Reduce to a low and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Remove from heat and stir in remaining chocolate, butter and extract.
  4. Stir until smooth.
  5. Cool to room temperature to thicken, then serve on homemade ice cream and fresh or canned sour cherries. Mmmm!

 

How to Make Apple Cider Vinegar from Apple Peelings.

Apple cider vinegar has become a buzz word amongst the health-conscious crowd lately, and rightfully so. It is not only a culinary necessity, but it can cure skin conditions, detangle hair, stop heartburn, play a roll in weight loss and detox the body. Click here for more information on apple cider vinegar. Real apple cider vinegar, with the mother, may be easy to find in the grocery store now, but it isn't cheap. In fact, you can expect to pay around $9.99 for 1 L (quart) at many grocery stores. This doesn't go over very well with the budget, but the good news is, it can be made for almost nothing, from apple scraps you would normally compost or feed to your chickens. AND it is easy to make. Sound good? Yes! Here is how. And start collecting your glass ACV or maple syrup bottles now! Make apple sauce/apple pies/apple fruit leather/apple WHATEVER, where peeling and coring the apples is involved. Enjoy your whatever, and keep your apple peelings. If you don't have enough for the first go round, store it in a zip lock or a jar in the freezer and add to it until you have enough. You can use apple cores too, if you aren't concerned about the minimal amount of cyanide that is in the apple seeds. If this is a concern for you, then just use the peels.Directions:
  1. Collect your apple peelings and put them in a gallon glass jar/container. Those large pickle jars from Costco, or from the thrift store, work perfectly. Even a large glass cookie jar will work.
  2. Once your jar is filled with peelings, cover it with a water/sugar syrup made from 1 gallon of boiling water with 1 cup of white sugar dissolved in it. Your peels might float a bit. Some people weight it down with something so they don't float. I don't bother.
  3. Set your jar in a cool, dark-ish location (I used my laundry room) and cover the jar with cheese cloth and an elastic, making sure it is thick enough that fruit flies won't get in. Because they will try!
  4. Stir once a day for 1 week.
  5. After a week, strain the apple peels through cheese cloth and allow to drain over a bowl overnight, to collect the juice. Then give the cheese cloth a good squeeze, and feed the apple peels to the chickens/pigs.
  6. Pour the strained juice back into the jar and cover with cheese cloth again.
  7. Stir once a day.
  8. Store in a cool location out of direct light for 6 weeks or until it tastes as strong as you'd like it.
  9. Bottle and store in your pantry or fridge indefinitely. Enjoy!
Tips:
  • If you notice mold on your apple cider vinegar at any stage, skim it off and keep going. I have never experienced mold growth but have read that it can happen.
  • Some people weight their apple peels down during the first week so no apple peels are exposed to air. They have a tendency to float. You can do this if you like, but as long as you stir it once a day I don't think it is necessary, and I never bother.
How to Make Apple Cider Vinegar from Apple Peelings.
Author: 
Recipe type: Condiment
 
Make your own apple cider vinegar from scrap apples!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 gallon water (4 litres)
  • Apple peels and cores
Instructions
  1. Collect your apple peelings and put them in a gallon glass jar/container. Those large pickle jars from Costco, or from the thrift store, work perfectly. Even a large glass cookie jar will work.
  2. Once your jar is filled with peelings, cover it with a water/sugar syrup made from 1 quart of boiling water with 1 cup of white sugar dissolved in it. Your peels might float a bit. Some people weight it down with something so they don’t float. I don’t bother.
  3. Set your jar in a cool, dark-ish location (I used my laundry room) and cover the jar with cheese cloth and an elastic, making sure it is thick enough that fruit flies won’t get in. Because they will try!
  4. Stir once a day for 1 week.
  5. After a week, strain the apple peels through cheese cloth and allow to drain over a bowl overnight, to collect the juice. Then give the cheese cloth a good squeeze, and feed the apple peels to the chickens/pigs.
  6. Pour the strained juice back into the jar and cover with cheese cloth again.
  7. Stir once a day.
  8. Store in a cool location out of direct light for 6 weeks or until it tastes as strong as you’d like it.
  9. Bottle and store in your pantry or fridge indefinitely. Enjoy!
Notes
◾If you notice mold on your apple cider vinegar at any stage, skim it off and keep going. I have never experienced mold growth but have read that it can happen. ◾Some people weight their apple peels down during the first week so no apple peels are exposed to air. They have a tendency to float. You can do this if you like, but as long as you stir it once a day I don’t think it is necessary, and I never bother.

 

 

Whole Wheat Sour Cream Cake Donuts. Mmmmm Good!

I love donuts, and always have.  I don’t love the fact that they are generally fried in trans-fats, made with white flour, and covered in white sugar that is almost guaranteed to be made from GMO sugar beets.

How about some donuts that are made using whole wheat flour, fried in coconut oil, and dipped in organic cane sugar?  Are they healthy?  They are still high in sugar so they aren’t exactly healthy, but in my opinion they beat regular donuts hands down. Nothing beats them for flavor, quality ingredients, and lack of preservatives, artificial color or flavour, and GMOs.  We all need a treat once in a while.  Try a quality treat like these!

While experimenting with recipes, I tried making 100% whole wheat donuts.  They tasted ok, but they might have worked better as hockey pucks than donuts.  I cut back to half white and half whole wheat to give them the nutty goodness of whole grains, and the extra lift from white flour.  Frying them in coconut oil gave them an amazing fragrance, a slightly tropical flavor, and eased my conscience where oil was concerned.

As with all my recipes using whole wheat, I now use freshly milled whole wheat flour ground by my Wonder Mill grain mill.  Whole wheat flour from a bag has been milled who knows how long ago.  The natural oils have gone rancid by the time you use the flour. The comparison between freshly-milled and bagged flour is incomparable.  Gone is the slightly rancid, slightly bitter flavor that I had so long associated with all whole wheat flour.  Instead, a healthy, nutty flavor is found and the bread rises better.

Give them a try!  Let me know what you think!

Notes:

Learn to make your own powdered sugar from non-GMO sugar or other sweetener here.
To make your donut-making experience better, buy a donut cutter here.

This recipe was adapted from The Messy Baker: Sour Cream Old Fashioned Doughnuts.

Whole Wheat Sour Cream Cake Donuts. Mmmmm Good!
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 12
 
Delicious, nutty-flavored, whole wheat donuts that are made with organic sugar and freshly-ground flour, then fried in coconut oil.
Ingredients
  • For Donuts:
  • 1¼ c. white flour
  • 1 c. whole wheat flour, freshly ground
  • 1½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • ¾ teaspoons ground nutmeg
  • •1/2 c. organic cane sugar
  • •2 tablespoons butter or lard
  • •2 large egg yolks
  • •2/3 c. sour cream
  • •coconut oil for frying
  • For Icing:
  • 3½c. icing sugar
  • 1½ teaspoon maple syrup
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ⅓ cup plus 1 tablespoon hot water, (plus more if needed)
Instructions
  1. For donuts:
  2. Mix flours, baking powder, salt and nutmeg together well in a medium sized bowl.
  3. With a mixer, mix sugar and butter together until gritty.
  4. Add eggs, one at a time, until well-mixed.
  5. Combine flour mixture with egg mixture. Stir just until combined.
  6. Dump contents of bowl onto floured counter top and kneed a few times to make a ball. Cover ball with plastic wrap and store in fridge for an hour or overnight.
  7. Roll dough on flour-dusted countertop to about half an inch thick.
  8. Cut donuts out of dough using a donut cutter or a large, round cookie cutter, using a bottle cap to cut out donut holes.
  9. Heat about 2 inches of coconut oil to 325F in a frying pan.
  10. Carefully place donuts into frying pan for a few seconds, and then flip when golden on one side. Donut is done when golden on both sides. This takes only a few seconds: watch them carefully!
  11. Remove from oil and place on cooling rack. When cool enough, Dip in icing and allow to cool fully. Serve.
  12. For icing:
  13. Mix all ingredients together and whisk until smooth.
  14. Dip top of donuts into icing and allow to dry on cooling rack.
Notes
The time stated to make the donuts does not include the chilling time. When you are considering making these donuts remember that they need to be chilled for 45 minutes or more before rolling out and frying.

 

 

This post has been linked up to Small Footprint Friday #51 and From The Farm Blog Hop.

Healthy and Delicious Hemp Heart Cookies. Gluten-Free!

I am always looking out for healthy snacks for my kids’ school lunches.  I can’t send peanuts to school and incorporating a healthy protein into their lunches is sometimes a challenge.  So what if I told you that you can make a cookie that is high in omegas, high in protein and gluten-free?  And that the kids go gaga over?  Alright, here it is.

Hemp hearts are the hulled seeds produced by the hemp plant.  They are very high in protein and omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, vitamin B and folic acid.  And if you are unfamiliar with hemp hearts but familiar with marijuana, NO they do NOT contain any THC and will NOT make you high :)  The hemp plant is grown legally for the food and textile industry whereas marijuana is grown for the illegal drug industry. Just thought I’d throw that in there just in case you were wondering.

Hemp hearts have a mild, nutty flavour.  They can be added to salads, any baking, smoothies and just about anything else.  Try some!  Find them at most natural food stores or purchase through my Amazon store here.

Thanks to my good friend Leah for sharing her recipe!

Healthy and Delicious Hemp Heart Cookies. Gluten-Free!
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 12 cookies
 
Ingredients
  • ⅔ c. brown cane sugar
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • ½ c. butter, melted and cooled.
  • ½ c. gluten-free flour (coconut, almond, rice or wheat flour)
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 c. hemp hearts
  • ½ c. dried cranberries
  • ½ c. dark chocolate chips
Instructions
  1. Mix together sugar, egg and butter.
  2. In a separate bowl, mix together flour, cinnamon, hemp hearts, cranberries and chocolate chips.
  3. Combine and mix well.
  4. Drop, in spoon-sized amounts, onto ungreased cookie sheets.
  5. Bake at 350 for 10-15 minutes or until just baked through.
  6. Remove from oven and allow to cool for 10 minutes before using a flipper to remove from cookie sheet. Cool completely on wire rack.

 
This recipe was shared on Waste Not Want Not Wednesdays #48.

How To Make Yogurt in Mason Jars and a Quilt.

Yogurt is, quite simply, super easy to make. As in, you’ll be shaking your head wondering why you haven’t tried it before. There are lots of reasons to make your own: it is economical, healthy, plastic-free, additive/preservative-free, and a good way to use up extra milk before it goes bad. And you don’t need to buy a yogurt maker to do it. Here is how to make it in mason jars and a quilt. Enjoy!!  This is one of life’s simple pleasures.

How To Make Yogurt in Mason Jars and a Quilt.
Author: 
Recipe type: Breakfast, snack, condiment
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
Simple instructions for a delicious yogurt made with ingredients and utensils you have at home.
Ingredients
  • 1 quart milk
  • 1 quart 18% cream (or milk)
  • 2 tbsp. plain yogurt with live culture (this is your starter)
Instructions
  1. In a large pot heat milk/cream to 110F. Remove from heat.
  2. Whisk in yogurt.
  3. Pour into quart jars and put on lids and rings.
  4. Place jars in a box or cooler completely surrounded and covered by a quilt.
  5. Store in warm location (room temperature)
  6. Leave for 10-12 hours then refrigerate jars.
  7. Serve.
Notes
If you want a thick, Greek-style yogurt, there are 3 ways to do it choose one: 1. Use half milk, half 18% table cream. If you don't want it that high in fat choose one of the next two options. 2. Add 2 tbsp. milk powder when you add the yogurt to thicken it. The final product will be thicker. 3. Strain it through cheese cloth after it is made to remove some of the whey which will make it thicker.

This post has been linked to Frugally Sustainable’s Frugal Days, Sustainable Ways #93.

Tasty Asian-Style Plum Sauce for Dipping or Stir-Frys

This year we were fortunate enough to receive 200 lb of Italian plums from my parents. 200 lb! What to do with 200 lb of plums! With 3 large dehydrators working 24/7, 12 quarts of plums canned, frozen plums, plum jam… I was searching for another recipe to use up some plums before they went bad. A reader suggested plum sauce, and I found a great recipe in the Bernardin (Ball) Home Canning Recipe Book. I made some alterations though, based on ingredients I had and flavors I liked. The result was a fantastic sweet and sour dipping sauce that is perfect for stir-fries, egg rolls, chicken fingers and more!

This recipe has been adapted from the Bernardin Home Canning recipe book.

 

Asian-Style Plum Sauce
Recipe type: Sauce
Cuisine: Asian, American
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8 half-pint jars
 
A simple and delicious Asian-style dipping sauce made with fresh Italian plums that is great on stir-frys, or as a dipping sauce for spring rolls or chicken fingers etc.
Ingredients
  • 4 pounds plums, pitted and chopped. (about 10 cups)
  • 2 cups brown organic cane sugar
  • 1 cup white organic cane sugar
  • ¾ cup chopped onion (about 1 medium)
  • 1 tbsp. dry mustard
  • 1 tsp. dried red pepper flakes (adjust to desired spiciness)
  • 1 tbsp. fresh ginger, minced
  • 1 tbsp. salt
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 c. distilled white vinegar (or apple cider vinegar)
  • 6 fresh basil leaves, chopped
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients except plums in a large pot and bring to a boil.
  2. Add plums and bring to a boil.
  3. Simmer for 30 minutes, or until desired consistency, stirring frequently.
  4. Using an immersion blender, blend ingredients until sauce is uniform in texture.
  5. Pour into prepared ½ pint canning jars, wipe rims clean, and add prepared lids and rings, according to manufacturer's instructions.
  6. Hot water bath can for 20 minutes.