Homemade Sustainably-Sourced Chocolates. Easy To Make and Delicious.

I stopped buying those cheap, junky chocolate Easter eggs from the dollar stores a few years ago. They are probably made in China, and definitely not all natural or sustainably-sourced. When my kids get treats, I like them to be at least made with safe ingredients. Even better, from reliable sources that aren’t damaging both the natural environment and the people who are growing and processing the cocoa beans.
Last year I bought sustainably-sourced chocolate bars, broke them into squares, and wrapped them in aluminum foil. This worked fine… but was kind of boring. This year, I made my own. It turned out to be a fun, rewarding experience, and was simple enough to have the children help out!

I made several different recipes, but found these two to be the best:

The recipe by Wellness Mama is made with sustainably-sourced cocoa butter and cocoa powder, raw honey and vanilla. Nothing more, nothing less. The recipe by Cupcake Project can also use sustainably-sourced, organic ingredients. One of the batches of chocolates I subbed 3/4 of the powdered sugar for raw honey and it turned out really well. In another batch I added a tbsp. of cashew butter to the white chocolate recipe for a nutty treat. If you can’t find organic powdered sugar you can make it yourself from this recipe from Whole New Mom using certified organic cane sugar and arrowroot powder to avoid the typical GMO sugar and GMO corn starch.

 


Both provided easy-to-follow instructions, used ingredients that can be sourced sustainably, and created a delicious product that I’ll be working with in the future! Think… dark chocolate with sea salt and butterscotch… white chocolate hazelnut… the possibilities are now endless! And what great gifts they would make!

If you make some, please let me know how they turned out, and if you varied the ingredients with great success! Enjoy and Happy Easter!

From The Farm Blog Hop is LIVE! And Why Support Native Bees On Your Farm.

Welcome everyone, to another From The Farm Blog Hop! My favorite this week “Why Support Native Bees On Your Farm” By Runamuk Acres.


Congratulations! Please feel free to grab our button and display it proudly on your blog!


Keep scrolling to enter this week’s party!

Now, on to this week’s party:
1. Link up to three of your best gardening or homesteading tips, farm-themed posts, recipes, homemaking and simple/frugal living tips, decorating ideas, DIY projects, craft ideas, thrifty makeovers or repurposed items, healthy and sustainable living tips, and giveaways.
2. Link back to my blog (using the rel=”nofollow” tag), or put the link party button anywhere on your blog or post to share the love.
3. Make sure to check out some of the other links before leaving.

 
We can’t wait to see what you share with us!
Note: Linking up to this party will automatically sign you up for an invite to next week’s party via email. To unsubscribe, please reply to any email you receive and you will be removed. Linking up also allows us permission to publish one of your photos on our blogs, Facebook, and/or Pinterest pages.


Warmly,Your From the Farm Blog Hop Co-Hosts:
The Homesteading Hippy | Sunny Simple Life | Grassfed Mama | The Mind to Homestead | My Healthy Green Family | Spring Mountain Living | Timber Creek Farm | Happy Days Farm | Better Hens and Gardens | The Granola Mommy
 

Easy Homemade Marshmallows Recipe

Marshmallows are a fun treat.  People roast them over bonfires, melt them in hot chocolate, make s’mores with them, make rice crispy squares with them and so on.  But have you ever read the ingredient list on a bag of Jet Puffed marshmallows?  It isn’t very pretty.

Corn Syrup, Sugar, Dextrose, Corn Starch Modified, Water, Gelatin, Tetrasodium Pyrophosphate A Whipping Aid, Flavor(s) Artificial, Color(s) Artificial (Blue 1)

 

Corn syrup is super-concentrated, highly processed, and made from GMO corn.  Sugar is made from GMO sugar beets.  Corn starch is made from GMO corn.  Tetrasodium pyrophosphate A is… well, a chemical used as a thickener, and if ingested in large doses requires immediate medical attention.  It is also a skin and eye irritant.   Yum.  Artificial flavor and color (color?  In white marshmallows?!) is self-explanatory.  So basically, they are trash.  I don’t want my kids to eat them, period.

But wait!  You CAN make them at home with safer and natural ingredients.  Easily!  You don’t have to forever ditch marshmallows!  And they taste better than store-bought ones.

Let me just say this first: everyone should make marshmallows at least once.  Partly because it is a fun, tasty treat, but also to demonstrate first-hand how much sugar is in a marshmallow.  It is rather astonishing, and proves that marshmallows should, indeed, be a once in a long time treat, even if you make them with safe ingredients.

Easy Homemade Marshmallows Recipe
Author: 
Recipe type: snack
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Total time: 

Serves: 24 marshmallows
 

Simple, delicious homemade marshmallows without the artificial ingredients, color, additives or GMOs.
Ingredients
  • Butter, for greasing the pan and parchment paper
  • 4 envelopes unflavored gelatin
  • 3 c. granulated sugar (I used organic white cane sugar)
  • 1¼ c. raw honey
  • ¼ tsp. sea salt
  • 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract
  • 1½ c. confectioner’s sugar (icing sugar)

Instructions
  1. Grease a 9×13 inch cake pan with butter. Add parchment paper on top of the buttered pan, and carefully fit it inside the pan. Allow 1 inch overhang on each side. Grease the paper well. Set aside.
  2. Put sugar, honey, salt and ¾ c. water in a small pot. Heat and stir until sugar is dissolved. Turn off heat.
  3. Put ¾ c. cold water in mixing bowl and then add gelatin. Stir well and let sit for 5 minutes.
  4. With a mixer, whisk water/gelatin mixture and add honey/sugar mixture slowly. Increase speed and whip on high until mixture is thick, white and forms peaks. Whip in vanilla. This could take 10 minutes.
  5. Pour into prepared baking dish, scrape bowl and smooth the top with buttered spatula.
  6. Set aside uncovered until firm, about 3 hours.
  7. Sift 1 c. icing sugar onto counter top. Grease your hands and a knife. Flip set mixture onto icing sugar on the counter top. Cut into squares.
  8. Dip marshmallows into remaining icing sugar on all sides and set on a plate.
  9. Serve immediately or store for up to a week in an airtight container.

The recipe is above.  For more details and photos please read below.

Notes:

  • It is very important to grease your hands and utensils before touching the marshmallows once the mixture is combined or you may be permanently stuck to the marshmallows!!
  • The marshmallows are slightly softer than store-bought ones.  The more days you let them sit, the firmer they become.
  • If using on a bon-fire, be very careful… they melt faster than store-bought ones and may fall off the stick if you don’t watch closely.
  • Unless you are using certified organic confectioners sugar you will be using GMO sugar with GMO corn starch added.  You can easily make your own confectioners sugar using organic white cane sugar and arrowroot powder by following this recipe.

1. Grease a 9×13 inch cake pan with butter. Add parchment paper on top of the buttered pan, and carefully fit it inside the pan. Allow 1 inch overhang on each side. Grease the paper well. Set aside.
2.Put sugar, honey, salt and 3/4 c. water in a small pot. Heat and stir until sugar is dissolved. Turn off heat.

3.  Put 3/4 c. cold water in mixing bowl and then add gelatin. Stir well and let sit for 5 minutes.

4. With a mixer, whisk water/gelatin mixture and add honey/sugar mixture slowly. Increase speed and whip on high until mixture is thick, white and forms peaks. Whip in vanilla. This could take 10 minutes.

5. Pour into prepared baking dish, scrape bowl and smooth the top with buttered spatula.  Set aside uncovered until firm, about 3 hours.

 

6. Sift 1 c. icing sugar onto counter top. Grease your hands and a knife. Flip set mixture onto icing sugar on the counter top. Cut into squares.
7.  Dip marshmallows into remaining icing sugar on all sides and set on a plate.  Serve immediately or store for up to a week in an airtight container.
 

 

 

Local Bite Giveaway!

Welcome to the Local Bite Giveaway! I am honored to be a part of such an exciting contest and challenge, with such a fantastic group of bloggers! One winner will be selected to receive ALL of these fantastic prizes.   My hope is that these items, coupled with the Local Bite Challenge itself, will help one winner continue on their journey to a more locally centered way of eating and living!  Good luck!  And please consider taking part in the challenge in whatever way you can!  Follow My Healthy Green Family on facebook as I enter my household of 6 into the challenge.

Learn more about each of the items and enter to win this phenomenal giveaway by following these four easy steps!

1) Click the below links to take a closer look at the amazing items included in this giveaway package! After reading about them all come back here to complete steps 2-4.

  1. One $200 Gift Certificate to Local Harvest, purchased by all of the bloggers participating in this giveaway (see the full list below)
  2. One “Locally Grown” t-shirt, graciously donated by Fed by Threads
  3. One Preserving by the Pint book, graciously donated by Marisa McClellan
  4. One set of autographed Homemade Living Series books, graciously donated by Ashley English
  5. One The Art of Gardening: Building Your Soil eBook, graciously donated by Susan of Learning and Yearning



3) Complete the mandatory skill question in the Rafflecopter.

4) Leave a comment below letting me know which prize you’re most excited about and/or why eating local is important to you!

Use the Rafflecopter widget below to confirm the above entries and unlock even more! Just follow the instructions in the Rafflecopter widget.

For even more ways to win, be sure to visit and subscribe to all of the amazing blogs who have come together to help me offer you this exciting giveaway!

Attainable Sustainable

Blue Yurt Farms

Ever Growing Farm

Faulk Farmstead

Five Little Homesteaders

Green Eggs & Goats

Homestead Honey

Mama Philosopher

The Jahner Farmstead

A winner will be randomly chosen via rafflecopter.com. We will announce the lucky winner on Monday, July 21, 2014. The winner will have 48 hours to respond with his/her full name, address, and phone number. There is no purchase necessary to win. This giveaway is only open to U.S. and Canadian Residents, ages 18 and older. Please see the full Terms & Conditions in the Rafflecopter widget

a Rafflecopter giveaway

GOOD LUCK!

Raising Pigs for Free: How to Scavenge Food For Your Pigs!

Bacon. Ham. Pork chops. Sausages. Pastry. Lard. So many great products from one animal.

My husband and I have been raising our own animals for meat, dairy, eggs and honey for the last few years. Up until last fall, the only meat we had produced ourselves was chicken. And farm-raised, free-range chicken is unbeatable. But you can’t make bacon out of chicken, and while we aren’t huge pork eaters, we do appreciate good quality pork on occasion. The problem was, I couldn’t find organic pork locally, and if I could, we would be paying a horrific price for it.

We are huge supporters of local, pasture-raised meat. We are also huge fans of certified organic products to avoid GMOs. We soon discovered that it was going to be impossible to find these products locally, and so if we were going to eat it, we would have to produce it ourselves. Bring on the pigs.

As usual, we jumped in. Sink or swim… we have learned to swim. And with pigs we learned fast.

We had a secure location for them, a nice, small barn, and… three bags of organic feed. We picked up 2 Yorkshire female piglets, age 6 weeks. They were just starting to get past the cute stage… a good thing. And they loved to eat. And eat. And eat. At $24 a bag for organic hog feed, we learned pretty quickly that we would have to come up with a better solution for food. At the rate we were going, our pigs would cost their weight in gold!

Pigs can do really well on pasture. They root up everything, eat weeds, roots, shoots, greens… everything. If you have an area you want cleared, as long as it is properly fenced, they will clear it for you and you won’t have to buy much food for them. If you DON’T have a secure field for them, you will have to provide a lot of food. LOTS of food. We live on just under 2 acres, and much of it is heavily treed. We really are only using about an acre, if that. Fencing is very expensive and our property is challenging to fence. So we knew that, at least this time, our pigs would be relying on twice-daily feedings of good, quality food.

In my opinion, hog feed isn’t awesome. In our area, the hog feed that is available, even the organic feed, is chock full of corn (pig junk food), and soy (cheap protein). Unless it is certified organic, both ingredients are likely to be GMO products. (Unless you are raising them on your own corn). Corn isn’t great for pigs… especially exclusively. It makes for a lot of fat, and not so much meat. Hog feed also generally contains vitamins and minerals, which may or may not be sourced naturally or GMO-free. And it is dry. I honestly can’t think of any mammal that would enjoy eating dry food its entire life. Or any mammal who would benefit from it. We don’t even feed our dog dry dog food. (She gets raw, frozen dog food).

Everyone knows pigs will eat anything. We needed to come up with something that was healthy, easy to source, and cheap. And everyone knows that it is who you know, not what you know. We raised our pigs on stale certified organic bread, and all the vegetable trimmings they could eat, provided from a local produce store. We also produced the best tasting ham, bacon, pork chops, and roasts you can ever imagine.

Sourcing free food:
Bakeries
Most bakeries have extra, stale bread that they need to get rid of. I found several local bakeries that gave away their stale bread. And stale?? Not really… more like, not sellable. 2 day old stuff won’t sell if there is fresh stuff. Phone around, talk to the local bakeries, and see if you can find one who will give you stale bread. And if you want organic, you might get as lucky as we did. We found a bakery that produces certified organic sourdough bread, and that would give us their extra. BIG TIME SCORE!

Produce Stores
Here is where you might have some issues. Don’t go to the big box stores, unless you know someone who can pull some strings for you. Go to the smaller, independently owned ones, and ask the owner or manager. We have connections with a small grocery store with a large produce section, and they gave us bags and bags of vegetable trimmings and fruit that was no longer sellable. Those pigs got everything from kale and chard to strawberries, watermelon and pumpkins! Their favorite, believe it or not, was kale. They didn’t like whole potatoes, eggplant, peppers, or citrus peels.

Milk Products
Pigs loooooove dairy. If you are so lucky as to have a cheese-making business nearby, ask them for their leftover whey. Pigs drink up whey like I would (like to) drink chocolate, and they benefit from the protein in it. Again, whey is a by-product and companies like to give it away rather than pay to dispose of it.

Bedding
Another tip… pigs need clean bedding. They are messy eaters, and they tend to get their bedding full of potato peelings and banana peels. If you don’t get wood chips delivered by the ton (and we don’t have storage for that kind of thing), then you know that wood chips by the bag are expensive. Head out to your local high school. Chances are they have a wood chipper and all their wood ends go through the chipper. I get bags and bags of wood chips for FREE from a local high school. Occasionally I drop off a dozen eggs for the teacher who lets me in, but that trade is worth it! The schools in our area have to bag it up and put it in the trash otherwise, which costs more to dispose of, so they are usually very willing to give it away.

We brought our pigs in to be processed almost a month ago now. We had the butcher package up the ground pork, roasts and chops, and the rest they gave us back fresh, uncured, unsmoked, to do ourselves. We spent the better part of 2 weeks curing 4 hams and 35 lb of bacon, then smoking it all on the BBQ. It wasn’t hard, although it was time consuming. But WORTH IT! Oh man was it worth it!

The flavour, the texture, the richness, made it worth it. Knowing that we raised our own pigs for our own meat in a humane, healthy environment, was worth it. Even the hard work made us feel good. We knew every mouthful of food that went into those pigs. We knew exactly how they were raised. We were happy to say that up until the very last moment, where they were killed humanely and efficiently by a local butcher, they were in our hands and well taken care of. Hard work pays off! In the end, we sold most of one pig, and kept the rest for ourselves. The cost of the butchering and packaging was paid off by the meat we sold. The benefit of having a local butcher do the processing was that the meat was inspected and so was legal to sell. And everyone wanted some! I think if we had raised 10 pigs we would have had no trouble selling the meat.

Thank you pigs. Indeed, it was your life for ours; we are very grateful.

From The Farm Blog Hop is LIVE and “How To Set Up Your First Beehive” favorite!

Welcome everyone, to another From The Farm Blog Hop! My favorite this week is How To Set Up Your First Bee Hive by Runamuk Acres. We keep bees and it has been such a positive experience! Check it out and learn how to set up your own.
Let’s get into the hop now!


Congratulations! Please feel free to grab our button and display it proudly on your blog!


Keep scrolling to enter this week’s party!

Now, on to this week’s party:
1. Link up to three of your best gardening or homesteading tips, farm-themed posts, recipes, homemaking and simple/frugal living tips, decorating ideas, DIY projects, craft ideas, thrifty makeovers or repurposed items, healthy and sustainable living tips, and giveaways.
2. Link back to my blog (using the rel=”nofollow” tag), or put the link party button anywhere on your blog or post to share the love.
3. Make sure to check out some of the other links before leaving.

 
We can’t wait to see what you share with us!
Note: Linking up to this party will automatically sign you up for an invite to next week’s party via email. To unsubscribe, please reply to any email you receive and you will be removed. Linking up also allows us permission to publish one of your photos on our blogs, Facebook, and/or Pinterest pages.


Warmly,Your From the Farm Blog Hop Co-Hosts:
The Homesteading Hippy | Sunny Simple Life | Grassfed Mama | The Mind to Homestead | My Healthy Green Family | Spring Mountain Living | Timber Creek Farm | Happy Days Farm | Better Hens and Gardens | The Granola Mommy
 

Homemade Shampoo With Rye Flour: Natural Pro-V for Thick, Shiny, Healthy Hair!


In our day and age shampoo is a necessity.  Everyone has it, and everyone uses it frequently.  Most commercial shampoos are made of a number of ingredients, almost all of them being chemicals, and almost none of them being natural.  Shampoo is actually a detergent, rather than a soap.  If you read the ingredients, you won’t find soap in there at all.  Many of the ingredients are questionable as far as our health goes, including potential carcinogens and developmental and reproductive toxicity such as glycol, diethanolamine DEA and cocamide DEA, methylparabens, propylparabens and formaldehyde.  Shampoos contain many thickeners, artificial fragrances and colors, and known skin irritants such as sodium laureth sulphate and alcohol.  If you can’t pronounce the words on the ingredient list, chances are you shouldn’t be pouring it on your scalp at regular intervals.

The good news is that there ARE alternatives.  Many of you have probably heard about washing your hair with baking soda.  This works in that it cleans the oil out of your hair, but it is also a strong base on the pH scale, and can dry out your hair if you use it long enough.  Some people also complain that it changes your hair color.  I used baking soda for 2 and a half years.  I liked using a 1-ingredient product that I was familiar with, but eventually I started noticing it was drying out my hair, and I started using conditioner to help with that.

Then I came across an article from another green blogger. Sonya from Kanelstrand shared her experience using rye flour. This article has inspired me to write this post.  In fact, it has brought me to great levels of excitement and I can’t help but tell everyone I see…

Rye flour.

Yes!  3 heaping tbsp. of organic, finely ground rye flour mixed with water so that it resembles a runny paste.  Rub it evenly onto your scalp and let it sit a few minutes while you finish your shower.  Then rinse off very well with warm water.

It is as easy and as cheap as that.

Does it work?
Yes!  Check out my pictures!  It leaves my hair squeaky clean, and adds a shine and softness incomparable to baking soda, or anything else.  No greasy roots, no dry ends.  No stripped hair.

Why does it leave your hair shiny and healthy?
Rye flour is loaded with vitamins, proteins and minerals.  You remember all those Pantene ads on TV where they talk about the Pro-V they add to their shampoo?  Well, the pantothenic acid they add in synthetic form is actually present in rye flour, in its natural form.  You can actually buy synthetic pantothenic acid vitamins to add to your hair to increase the strength, shine and overall health.  While those versions are man-made these occur naturally in rye flour, helping restructure dry and damaged hair, boost shine and improve manageability. Click here for more information on how pantothenic acid benefits hair.

Rye flour also contains all the vitamin Bs, vitamin E, and phytonutrients such as lignans, phenolic acids, phytic acid, plant sterols and saponins which are also used to help with hair re-growth and even skin regeneration.

Rye flour is naturally perfectly pH balanced.  This is a huge reason why you should use it over baking soda.  Rye flour tests 5.5 on the pH scale which is the same as our hair, and so will not dry it out or strip it of its natural oils.

What kind of rye flour to buy?
I use certified organic dark rye flour that is finely ground.  (ie. you can’t see bits of husk in it).  I have a flour mill so will likely try grinding my own soon…

Who shouldn’t use it?
Those with Celiac disease should not use it since rye flour contains gluten.

Is it easy to switch to using rye flour?
As with the baking soda method, you may experience a period of time when your scalp and hair adjust to the change.  If you have been shampooing every day with a regular commercial shampoo you may notice a few weeks where your hair gets greasier faster, but you may not experience it at all.

Can I use a conditioner with it?
Yes you can.  Or you can use apple cider vinegar (with a ratio of 1 cup water to 1 tbsp. vinegar) as a rinse.  Pour it on your hair, let it sit a moment, then rinse well.  Once your hair dries, it no longer smells like vinegar.  Apple Cider Vinegar works as a detangler.

Tips:

  • After washing with rye flour, rinse VERY WELL to make sure there is no flour left in your hair.  It will itch… I have done it.
  • Do not use if you have Celiac Disease.
  • Make sure the flour you use is finely ground and doesn’t contain bits of husk or you’ll be brushing that out of your hair forever.

For more information on washing your hair with rye flour read:
Kanelstrand: Homemade Shampoo Review: Rye Flour
Washing Hair Without Shampoo: Rye Flour

This post has been shared on From The Farm Blog Hop, Frugal Days, Sustainable Ways #112, and Heritage Homesteaders Blog Hop #4.

Off The Shelf: Homemade Alternatives to the Condiments and Snacks you Love.

Coming to you from some of the top real-food bloggers on the web! Off The Shelf is a brand new e-book loaded with easy to make recipes for condiments, toppings and snacks you love. Included is my own Asian Plum Sauce recipe!  Save your health and your money by making your own!

Buy Now

Note: You do not need an e-reader to download this e-book!  Save it and access it on your computer.

Buy Now

Off The Shelf Contributors:

Christy of Completely Nourished, Colleen of Five Little Homesteaders, Joelle of jarOhoney, Karon of Larder Love, Kris of Attainable Sustainable, Leona of My Healthy Green Family, Libby of eat.play.love…more, Melanie of Frugal Kiwi, Pam of Brown Thumb Mama, Susan of Learning and Yearning, Tracy of Oh, The Things We’ll Make!, Vanessa of They Call Me Oystergirl, and Vivian of The Real Food Guide.

 

How to Make Whole Grain Pancake Mix From Scratch

Pancakes are a treat in my household, and also a go-to meal when I am on the run. I make them for breakfast on school mornings, and I make them when I am late arriving home for the evening, and I need a quick meal on the table. I am not a fan of any kind of store-bought mix, partly because many of them contain unhealthy preservatives and GMO ingredients, and partly because they are ridiculously easy to make from scratch, especially with a homemade mix. I took my favorite pancake recipe, one I have altered over the years to fit my family’s needs and likes, and turned it into a “quick-mix” type pancake mix. All you need to do is add an egg, milk and oil and you have batter ready for the pan! Freeze the left overs and they make even quicker breakfasts for the toaster.

How to Make Pancake Mix From Scratch
Author: 
Recipe type: Baking Mix
Cuisine: Breakfast
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: 4
 

From scratch pancake mix recipe. Easy and healthy!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup flour (whole wheat, spelt, white, or a combination)
  • 1 tbsp. Demerara sugar
  • 1 tbsp. ground flax
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. salt

Instructions
  1. Combine the ingredients and mix well.
  2. Store in an air-tight jar.
  3. Double, quadruple or more the recipe!

Notes
When making pancakes, to 1 cup of mix add: 1 egg, beaten. 1 c. milk (goat, cow or non-dairy). 2 tbsp. melted butter or coconut oil. To make a double batch, simply add 2 cups mix and double the wet ingredients.

 

The Best Homemade Hot Fudge Sauce Ever!

Nothing beats a hot fudge sundae… unless it is a hot fudge sundae made with homemade ice cream and homemade hot fudge sauce. Most hot fudge sauces contain artificial flavor and color, preservatives, high fructose corn syrup and thickeners, making it a treat not worthy of it’s calling. Thankfully it is easy to make with all natural ingredients, and tastes far better than any product you could buy. This recipe is coming to you just in time for Valentine’s Day! Bring on the sundaes!  This recipe is adapted from Smitten Kitchen’s Hot Fudge Sundae Cake recipe.

 

The Best Homemade Hot Fudge Sauce Ever!
Author: 
Recipe type: Condiment
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: 2 cups
 

All Natural Homemade Hot Fudge Sauce. Can we -almost- say healthy?
Ingredients
  • ⅔ cup heavy or whipping cream
  • ½ cup honey
  • ⅓ cup packed dark brown sugar
  • ¼ cup cocoa powder
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 1 cup chocolate chips, divided
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • ½ tsp. vanilla extract

Instructions
  1. In a heavy saucepan, bring cream, honey, sugar, cocoa, salt and half the chocolate to a boil.
  2. Reduce to a low and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Remove from heat and stir in remaining chocolate, butter and extract.
  4. Stir until smooth.
  5. Cool to room temperature to thicken, then serve on homemade ice cream and fresh or canned sour cherries. Mmmm!